Blount County Justice Center closed to public until January

News, Press Release
Blount County Justice Center
MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE – Blount County Sheriff James Lee Berrong announced the Blount County Justice Center will close to in-person business beginning Friday, December 18 and with plans to re-open to the public beginning Monday, January 4. This is due to an uptick in COVID-19 cases across the county. The closure will NOT affect Patrol or Corrections operations.
“Once again, we had to make a very tough decision to close to in-person business in order to protect our employees and the citizens,” Sheriff Berrong said. “With the vaccine rolling out over the next couple of weeks, we are hoping we will see a drop in cases over the next few weeks, and we can resume normal operations January 4. In the meantime, Sheriff’s Office employees will continue to report to work and serve the public.”
During this time, citizens will be able to access the different Sheriff’s operations by way of phone Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Citizens can reach the following operations at the phone numbers listed below:
• Call 911 for emergencies
• To speak with a deputy, call (865)983-3620
• Records Office (865)273-5003
• For incident reports, accident reports, background checks, or other records-related transactions, email [email protected]
• Criminal Investigations (865)273-5001
• Court Services (865)273-5002
• Adult Corrections (865)273-5245
• Narcotics (865)977-SANO
• Video visitation from the 24-hour jail lobby will continue to be limited to three stations, and we will be enforcing the 10 person limit for gatherings. Onsite video visitation is open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., seven days a week. We strongly encourage citizens to access video visitation from home.
The Justice Center is already scheduled for holiday closures on December 23, 24, and 25 for Christmas, and December 31 and January 1 for New Year’s.
Blount County General Sessions Court will hold in-custody criminal dockets on Monday, December 21 and Wednesday, December 30. All other courts are rescheduled.
The BCSO and the Blount County Justice Center are continuing to follow CDC guidelines regarding routine environmental cleaning, but during the closure, the maintenance staff will deep clean throughout the building.
“Closing the Justice Center to in-person business was a last resort option, but we felt it was necessary to protect everyone’s health, Sheriff Berrong said. “We are praying that we will see an overall improvement in COVID cases over the next few weeks. Until then, our deputies will continue serving our citizens to the best of our abilities. We hope everyone can stay healthy during the holidays so they can spend time with their families during the Christmas season.”

Ask The Doc! Fighting Off Covid-19

Community, Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, The doctors address a comment left on one of the Ask The Doc Segments. What drugs are good for fighting off Covid-19 or do we just wait on a vaccine? The Doctors also address the President and first lady testing positive for Covid-19. What do the Doctors have to say about testing positive with no symptoms? When could he have contracted the virus? How long has he had it? All this and more on Ask The Doc!

 

Ask The Doc! College And Covid-19

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, the doctors discuss how colleges are dealing with Covid-19. When a Student tests positive, the colleges continue classes and give the infected student their own quarantined dorm. Is this the approach we should be taking with everything? Should we worry over the numbers? Hear Doctor Whaley and Doctor Tidman’s point of view on this right here on Ask the Doc!

 

Tennessee’s Economic Recovery Group updates guidance for close contact in public

Press Release, State & National
Economic recovery close contact

Nashville, Tenn. – Tennessee’s Economic Recovery Group continues to advance the state’s reopening plan, issuing updated guidelines today for close contact service businesses, exercise facilities and recreation activities under the Tennessee Pledge. In addition, the ERG added recommendations for large community events to the previously issued guidance for attractions and large venues. Events like fairs, festivals, expos and parades may be held in accordance with social distancing guidelines, and the ERG has provided additional recommendations to mitigate COVID-19 transmission.

“Thanks to the continued hard work of Tennesseans and business owners operating responsibly, we’re able to further reopen our state’s economy,” said Gov. Lee. “These new guidelines provide useful information so that we can enjoy the events that connect us to our neighbors and communities, and allow businesses to operate in a way that protects the wellbeing of their customers and employees.”

Updated guidelines for close contact services, exercise facilities and recreation activities now focus on social distancing measures rather than strict capacity limits. In addition, the guidelines for close contact businesses also provide guidance for resuming certain services that require the removal of face-coverings.

ERG also expanded guidance for attractions and large venues to include recommendations for large community events such as fairs and festivals. To protect Tennesseans from the spread of COVID-19, venues should implement measures to encourage social distancing, reduce occupancy and crowd density, encourage the use of cloth face coverings and increase sanitization.

Full guidelines can be found on TNpledge.com for:

Six counties – Shelby, Madison, Davidson, Hamilton, Knox and Sullivan – may continue to follow individual, county-specific reopening plans created in consultation with State and local health departments.

The Economic Recovery Group (ERG), composed of 30 leaders from the public and private sector, is crafting guidance to assist businesses in a safe reopening. The industry representatives participating in the ERG collectively represent over 140,000 Tennessee businesses that employ over 2.5M Tennesseans. More information about ERG is available here.

Tennessee lifting restaurants and retail capacity restrictions

Announcements, Community, Press Release
Economic recovery close contact

Nashville, Tenn. – As Tennessee continues to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, the state’s Economic Recovery Group announced today it will lift capacity restrictions on restaurants and retail to instead focus on social distancing best practices effective May 22 and issue guidelines to facilitate the safe reopening of larger, non-contact attractions on or after May 22. New Tennessee Pledge guidelines will be released this week. Six counties – Shelby, Madison, Davidson, Hamilton, Knox, and Sullivan – may continue to follow individual, county-specific reopening plans created in consultation with State and local health departments.

“Tennesseans have worked incredibly hard to do their part and help slow the spread of COVID-19 so that our state can begin to reopen. Thanks to their continued efforts, we’re able to allow restaurants and retail businesses to operate at greater capacity and large attractions to open in a safe and thoughtful way,” said Governor Bill Lee. “Our state continues to see downward trends in case growth and meets the White House criteria for a phased reopening. This progress has been hard-won, and we can build upon it by reopening while also maintaining common-sense safety measures like mask-wearing and good hygiene. By taking the Tennessee Pledge, our businesses can reopen in a way that protects the health of their customers and employees, and protects the livelihoods of hard-working Tennesseans.”

Gov. Bill Lee

The new Large Attractions guidance applies to those businesses that can effectively practice social distancing with strong measures to protect both employees and customers, including racetracks, amusement parks, waterparks, theaters and dinner theaters, auditoriums, large museums and more. Restrictions on social gatherings of more than 10 people remain in place for the time being. Updates to Restaurant Guidance will include a lift on capacity restrictions, allowing for increased service as long as social distancing guidelines are adhered to, including 6 feet between tables.

The updated guidelines come as Tennessee continues to meet the White House state gating criteria for phased reopening. The gating criteria include:

Symptoms

  •  Downward trajectory of influenza-like illnesses (ILI) reported within a 14-day period; AND
  •  Downward trajectory of COVID-like syndromic (CLI) cases reported within a 14-day period

Cases

  • Downward trajectory of documented cases within a 14-day period; OR
  • Downward trajectory of positive tests as a percent of total tests within a 14-day period (flat or increasing volume of tests)

Hospitals

  • Treat all patients without crisis care; AND
  • Robust testing program in place for at-risk healthcare workers, including emerging antibody testing

Hospital capacity remains sufficient to meet the needs of patients, while the state continues to meet the goal of testing 2 percent of the population per month.

The Economic Recovery Group (ERG), composed of 30 leaders from the public and private sector, is crafting guidance to assist businesses in a safe reopening. The industry representatives participating in the ERG collectively represent over 140,000 Tennessee businesses that employ over 2.5M Tennesseans. More information about ERG is available here.

Graphs are available here.

16,370 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Tennessee, 8,624 recovered

Health
confirmed cases

In an effort to keep our readers, up to date with the latest number of cases confirmed in Tenn., Fetch Your News will continually be updating this article with the most recent updates from Tenn. Department of Health (TDH).

As of May 13, 2020, TDH reported 16,370 cases statewide, 273 deaths, and 8,624 recovered. The highest concentration is in Davidson with 3,623 cases, 37 deaths, and 1,950 recovered. TDH reported that 283,924 tests have been completed in the state.

Out of the positive cases around 8 percent have required hospitalization and 52 percent have recovered from home. Information about hospitalization status is gathered at the time of diagnosis, therefore this information may be incomplete. This number indicates the number of patients that were ever hospitalized during their illness, it does not indicate the number of patients currently hospitalized.

49 percent of cases have fully recovered from the virus. TDH defines “recovered” as people who (1) have been confirmed to be asymptomatic by their local or regional health department and have completed their required isolation period or (2)are at least 21 days beyond the first test confirming their illness.

Up to date map of COVID-19 spread in Tenn.

County Breakdown

3,623 Davidson

37 deaths, 24,120 negative

3,475 Shelby

75 deaths, 32,822 negative

1,381 Trousdale

deaths, 1,646 negative

780 Rutherford

20 deaths, 7,911 negative

714 Sumner

40 deaths, 5,240 negative

603 Bledsoe

deaths, 3,144 negative

453 Williamson

10 deaths, 7,012 negative

400 Tipton

deaths, 2,495 negative

309 Wilson

deaths, 3,671 negative

300 Lake

deaths, 1,156 negative

295 Knox

deaths, 10,339 negative

286 Hamilton

13 deaths, 4,600 negative

246 Bedford

deaths, 1,860 negative

245 Robertson

deaths, 2,398 negative

191 Montgomery

deaths, 5,058 negative

190 Putnam

deaths, 2,812 negative

177 Hardeman

deaths, 3,327 negative

156 Madison

deaths, 3,820 negative

123 McMinn

deaths, 2,013 negative

88 Dickson

deaths, 1,543 negative

87 Cumberland

deaths, 2,600 negative

85 Fayette

deaths, 1,638 negative

78 Cheatham

deaths, 1,306 negative

75 Bradley

deaths, 1,708 negative

74 Blount

deaths, 2,261 negative

71 Macon

deaths, 1,017 negative

65 Sevier

deaths, 2,768 negative

64 Washington

deaths, 2,437 negative

58 Maury

deaths, 2,118 negative

57 Gibson

deaths, 1,740 negative

56 Coffee

deaths, 1,576 negative

54 Sullivan

deaths, 2,545 negative

52 Hickman

deaths, 716 negative

47 Greene

deaths, 1,399 negative

46 Loudon

deaths, 1,075 negative

44 Dyer

deaths, 1,048 negative

41 Franklin

deaths, 1,576 negative

40 Lauderdale

deaths, 2,749 negative

35 Anderson

deaths, 3,149 negative

33 Monroe

deaths, 644 negative

31 Hawkins

deaths, 1,145 negative

30 Grundy

deaths, 381 negative

29 Marion

deaths, 645 negative

28 DeKalb

deaths, 934 negative

28 Haywood

deaths, 552 negative

26 Jefferson

deaths, 1,269 negative

25 Hamblen

deaths, 1,729 negative

24 Marshall

deaths, 794 negative

24 Smith

deaths, 638 negative

24 Weakley

deaths, 776 negative

22 Carroll

deaths, 849 negative

22 Meigs

deaths, 357 negative

21 Lawrence

deaths, 1,109 negative

19 Cocke

deaths, 709 negative

18 Carter

deaths, 1,058 negative

17 Campbell

deaths, 1,050 negative

17 White

deaths, 974 negative

16 Lincoln

deaths, 912 negative

16 Obion

deaths, 636 negative

15 Henry

deaths, 927 negative

15 Johnson

deaths, 1,781 negative

14 Overton

deaths, 829 negative

13 Cannon

deaths, 373 negative

13 Perry

deaths, 116 negative

13 Warren

deaths, 1,303 negative

12 Chester

deaths, 406 negative

12 Crockett

deaths, 387 negative

12 Humphreys

deaths, 449 negative

12 McNairy

deaths, 550 negative

12 Morgan

deaths, 2,721 negative

12 Polk

deaths, 380 negative

11 Scott

deaths, 461 negative

10 Henderson

deaths, 759 negative

10 Jackson

deaths, 487 negative

9 Giles

deaths, 720 negative

8 Hardin

deaths, 1,032 negative

8 Roane

deaths, 2,245 negative

7 Claiborne

deaths, 493 negative

7 Sequatchie

deaths, 762 negative

7 Stewart

deaths, 257 negative

6 Benton

deaths, 634 negative

6 Clay

deaths, 305 negative

6 Fentress

deaths, 495 negative

6 Grainger

deaths, 427 negative

6 Houston

deaths, 217 negative

6 Rhea

deaths, 819 negative

4 Decatur

deaths, 232 negative

4 Union

deaths, 361 negative

3 Moore

deaths, 224 negative

3 Unicoi

deaths, 358 negative

3 Wayne

deaths, 320 negative

2 Lewis

deaths, 200 negative

2 Van Buren

deaths, 278 negative

1 Pickett

deaths, 201 negative

0 Hancock

deaths, 101 negative

14,768 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Tennessee, 7,369 recovered

Health
confirmed cases

In an effort to keep our readers, up to date with the latest number of cases confirmed in Tenn., Fetch Your News will continually be updating this article with the most recent updates from Tenn. Department of Health (TDH).

As of May 9, 2020 at 5:35 p.m., TDH reported 14,768 cases statewide, 242 deaths, and 7,369 recovered. The highest concentration is in Davidson with 3,401 cases, 31 deaths, and 1,758 recovered. TDH reported that 243,578 tests have been completed in the state.

Out of the positive cases around 9 percent have required hospitalization and 54 percent have recovered from home. Information about hospitalization status is gathered at the time of diagnosis, therefore this information may be incomplete. This number indicates the number of patients that were ever hospitalized during their illness, it does not indicate the number of patients currently hospitalized.

49 percent of cases have fully recovered from the virus. TDH defines “recovered” as people who (1) have been confirmed to be asymptomatic by their local or regional health department and have completed their required isolation period or (2)are at least 21 days beyond the first test confirming their illness.

Up to date map of COVID-19 spread in Tenn.

County Breakdown

3,401  Davidson

31 deaths, 22,338 negative

3,260  Shelby

68 deaths, 29,083 negative

1,357  Trousdale

2 deaths, 1,611 negative

725  Rutherford

14 deaths, 7,226 negative

698  Sumner

38 deaths, 4,897 negative

604  Bledsoe

0 deaths, 3,112 negative

443  Williamson

10 deaths, 6,372 negative

300  Wilson

6 deaths, 3,461 negative

263  Knox

5 deaths, 9,357 negative

237  Bedford

3 deaths, 1,740 negative

233  Hamilton

13 deaths, 4,339 negative

218  Robertson

0 deaths, 2,173 negative

175  Putnam

5 deaths, 2,713 negative

174  Montgomery

2 deaths, 4,521 negative

159  Tipton

2 deaths, 1,834 negative

151  Hardeman

0 deaths, 2,136 negative

151  Madison

1 deaths, 3,571 negative

117  McMinn

5 deaths, 1,901 negative

86  Dickson

0 deaths, 1,439 negative

85  Cumberland

1 deaths, 2,289 negative

79  Fayette

1 deaths, 1,481 negative

71  Blount

3 deaths, 1,984 negative

69  Bradley

1 deaths, 1,524 negative

65  Sevier

2 deaths, 2,364 negative

63  Cheatham

0 deaths, 1,191 negative

61  Washington

0 deaths, 2,254 negative

59  Lake

0 deaths, 1,138 negative

58  Macon

3 deaths, 941 negative

55  Maury

0 deaths, 1,986 negative

54  Gibson

1 deaths, 1,553 negative

54  Sullivan

1 deaths, 2,282 negative

53  Coffee

0 deaths, 1,437 negative

52  Hickman

0 deaths, 668 negative

46  Greene

2 deaths, 1,161 negative

41  Dyer

0 deaths, 918 negative

41  Loudon

0 deaths, 870 negative

40  Franklin

1 deaths, 1,472 negative

31  Anderson

1 deaths, 2,764 negative

31  Hawkins

2 deaths, 1,074 negative

30  Grundy

1 deaths, 357 negative

29  Marion

1 deaths, 622 negative

28  Monroe

1 deaths, 579 negative

27  DeKalb

0 deaths, 820 negative

26  Haywood

1 deaths, 471 negative

26  Jefferson

0 deaths, 1,104 negative

26  Lauderdale

0 deaths, 785 negative

24  Marshall

1 deaths, 736 negative

24  Smith

1 deaths, 594 negative

24  Weakley

0 deaths, 730 negative

22  Meigs

0 deaths, 253 negative

21  Hamblen

2 deaths, 1,375 negative

20  Lawrence

0 deaths, 1,040 negative

19  Carroll

1 deaths, 780 negative

18  Carter

1 deaths, 968 negative

17  Campbell

1 deaths, 941 negative

17  Cocke

0 deaths, 636 negative

16  Lincoln

0 deaths, 817 negative

16  Obion

1 deaths, 570 negative

16  White

0 deaths, 827 negative

15  Henry

0 deaths, 836 negative

13  Cannon

0 deaths, 354 negative

13  Perry

0 deaths, 106 negative

12  Chester

0 deaths, 364 negative

12  Humphreys

1 deaths, 410 negative

12  Morgan

0 deaths, 2,584 negative

12  Polk

0 deaths, 337 negative

12  Warren

0 deaths, 1,214 negative

11  McNairy

0 deaths, 523 negative

11  Overton

0 deaths, 772 negative

11  Scott

0 deaths, 422 negative

10  Henderson

0 deaths, 717 negative

10  Jackson

0 deaths, 456 negative

 Crockett

0 deaths, 367 negative

 Giles

0 deaths, 684 negative

 Hardin

0 deaths, 954 negative

 Roane

0 deaths, 2,012 negative

 Claiborne

0 deaths, 440 negative

 Stewart

0 deaths, 234 negative

 Benton

1 deaths, 477 negative

 Clay

0 deaths, 282 negative

 Fentress

0 deaths, 461 negative

 Grainger

0 deaths, 372 negative

 Houston

0 deaths, 208 negative

 Rhea

0 deaths, 733 negative

 Sequatchie

0 deaths, 737 negative

 Johnson

0 deaths, 260 negative

 Decatur

0 deaths, 215 negative

 Moore

0 deaths, 208 negative

 Unicoi

0 deaths, 341 negative

 Union

0 deaths, 334 negative

 Wayne

0 deaths, 301 negative

 Lewis

0 deaths, 190 negative

 Van Buren

0 deaths, 266 negative

 Pickett

0 deaths, 199 negative

 Hancock

0 deaths, 92 negative

 

14,096 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Tennessee, 6,783 recovered

Health
confirmed cases

In an effort to keep our readers, up to date with the latest number of cases confirmed in Tenn., Fetch Your News will continually be updating this article with the most recent updates from Tenn. Department of Health (TDH).

As of May 7, 2020 at 5:35 p.m., TDH reported 14,096 cases statewide, 237 deaths, and 6,783 recovered. The highest concentration is in Davidson with 3,157 cases, 31 deaths, and 1,601 recovered. TDH reported that 227,101 tests have been completed in the state.

Out of the positive cases around 9 percent have required hospitalization and 52 percent have recovered from home. Information about hospitalization status is gathered at the time of diagnosis, therefore this information may be incomplete. This number indicates the number of patients that were ever hospitalized during their illness, it does not indicate the number of patients currently hospitalized.

47 percent of cases have fully recovered from the virus. TDH defines “recovered” as people who (1) have been confirmed to be asymptomatic by their local or regional health department and have completed their required isolation period or (2)are at least 21 days beyond the first test confirming their illness.

Up to date map of COVID-19 spread in Tenn.

County Breakdown

3,157  Davidson

31 deaths, 19,632 negative

3,066  Shelby

64 deaths, 26,371 negative

1,356  Trousdale

2 deaths, 1,576 negative

672  Sumner

38 deaths, 4,340 negative

661  Rutherford

14 deaths, 6,487 negative

602  Bledsoe

0 deaths, 3,092 negative

434  Williamson

10 deaths, 5,908 negative

288  Wilson

6 deaths, 3,182 negative

253  Knox

5 deaths, 8,597 negative

217  Bedford

3 deaths, 1,629 negative

211  Hamilton

13 deaths, 3,919 negative

195  Robertson

0 deaths, 1,893 negative

162  Putnam

5 deaths, 2,381 negative

158  Tipton

2 deaths, 1,676 negative

155  Montgomery

2 deaths, 4,123 negative

145  Madison

1 deaths, 3,258 negative

108  McMinn

3 deaths, 1,755 negative

85  Dickson

0 deaths, 1,354 negative

84  Cumberland

1 deaths, 2,091 negative

73  Fayette

1 deaths, 1,349 negative

69  Blount

3 deaths, 1,856 negative

64  Bradley

1 deaths, 1,390 negative

63  Sevier

2 deaths, 2,168 negative

59  Lake

0 deaths, 1,109 negative

59  Washington

0 deaths, 2,106 negative

58  Cheatham

0 deaths, 1,097 negative

55  Macon

3 deaths, 842 negative

52  Gibson

1 deaths, 1,479 negative

52  Maury

0 deaths, 1,844 negative

52  Sullivan

1 deaths, 2,071 negative

48  Hickman

0 deaths, 630 negative

47  Coffee

0 deaths, 1,320 negative

43  Greene

2 deaths, 1,023 negative

39  Dyer

0 deaths, 864 negative

38  Loudon

0 deaths, 808 negative

37  Franklin

1 deaths, 1,398 negative

31  Anderson

1 deaths, 2,560 negative

31  Hawkins

2 deaths, 1,013 negative

30  Grundy

1 deaths, 339 negative

29  Marion

1 deaths, 594 negative

26  Haywood

1 deaths, 450 negative

26  Jefferson

0 deaths, 1,032 negative

26  Monroe

1 deaths, 536 negative

25  DeKalb

0 deaths, 735 negative

25  Lauderdale

0 deaths, 628 negative

24  Marshall

1 deaths, 699 negative

24  Weakley

0 deaths, 704 negative

23  Hardeman

0 deaths, 631 negative

23  Smith

1 deaths, 535 negative

20  Hamblen

2 deaths, 1,244 negative

19  Carroll

1 deaths, 751 negative

19  Lawrence

0 deaths, 979 negative

18  Carter

1 deaths, 864 negative

17  Cocke

0 deaths, 578 negative

17  Meigs

0 deaths, 213 negative

16  Campbell

1 deaths, 876 negative

16  Lincoln

0 deaths, 761 negative

16  White

0 deaths, 733 negative

15  Obion

1 deaths, 523 negative

14  Henry

0 deaths, 807 negative

13  Cannon

0 deaths, 332 negative

13  Perry

0 deaths, 96 negative

12  Polk

0 deaths, 278 negative

11  Humphreys

1 deaths, 380 negative

11  McNairy

0 deaths, 498 negative

11  Overton

0 deaths, 718 negative

11  Scott

0 deaths, 320 negative

10  Chester

0 deaths, 344 negative

10  Henderson

0 deaths, 691 negative

10  Warren

0 deaths, 1,134 negative

 Giles

0 deaths, 656 negative

 Jackson

0 deaths, 430 negative

 Roane

0 deaths, 1,806 negative

 Benton

1 deaths, 359 negative

 Claiborne

0 deaths, 398 negative

 Crockett

0 deaths, 349 negative

 Hardin

0 deaths, 919 negative

 Sequatchie

0 deaths, 700 negative

 Stewart

0 deaths, 218 negative

 Clay

0 deaths, 262 negative

 Grainger

0 deaths, 346 negative

 Houston

0 deaths, 199 negative

 Morgan

0 deaths, 400 negative

 Rhea

0 deaths, 668 negative

 Fentress

0 deaths, 424 negative

 Johnson

0 deaths, 125 negative

 Decatur

0 deaths, 205 negative

 Wayne

0 deaths, 287 negative

 Moore

0 deaths, 193 negative

 Union

0 deaths, 315 negative

 Lewis

0 deaths, 167 negative

 Unicoi

0 deaths, 318 negative

 Van Buren

0 deaths, 243 negative

 Hancock

0 deaths, 87 negative

 Pickett

0 deaths, 184 negative

 

DPH Release – Expanded Testing For COVID-19 In Georgia

Featured, Health

Revised Testing Criteria and Increased Number of Test Sites

Atlanta – The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is increasing the number of specimen
collection sites statewide for COVID-19 testing, and is revising the current testing criteria to
accommodate more testing of Georgia residents.

Effective immediately, all symptomatic individuals will be eligible for COVID-19 testing. Health
care workers, first responders, law enforcement and long-term care facility residents and staff will
still be prioritized for testing regardless of whether they are or are not symptomatic.
Referrals are still required, however, there are now two ways to be referred to a DPH specimen
collection site:

Local Health Department –
Individuals who meet COVID-19 testing criteria may now be referred to DPH specimen collection
sites by contacting their local health department. They will be screened by appropriate health
department staff and referred to the closest, most convenient specimen collection site.

Contact information for local health departments can be found on the DPH homepage, under COVID-19 in Georgia.

Health Care Provider Referral –
Health care providers and/or physicians can and should continue to refer patients for COVID-19
testing.

People should not arrive unannounced or without a scheduled appointment at a specimen
collection site, hospital, emergency room or other health care facility. Only individuals who have
been evaluated by public health or a health care provider and assigned a PUI # number will
be referred to these drive-thru sites.

Together we can stop further spread of COVID-19 in our state and save lives.

Stay home – the Governor has issued a shelter-in-place Executive Order that should be observed
by all residents and visitors.

Practice social distancing – keep at least 6 feet between yourself and other people.

Wash your hands – use soap and water and scrub for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based
hand sanitizer (60% alcohol) if soap and water aren’t readily available.
Wear a mask – the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend the use of face
masks to help slow the spread of COVID-19, especially where socials distancing is difficult to
maintain (grocery stores, pharmacies, etc.), and especially in areas of significant community-
based transmission.

For more information about COVID-19 Click here or
Click Here.

For updates on the COVID-19 situation as it develops, follow @GaDPH, @GeorgiaEMA, and
@GovKemp on Twitter and @GaDPH, @GEMA.OHS, and @GovKemp on Facebook.

New Data Supports Social Distancing Now More Than Ever

Featured, Health, News
Department of public health

News Release from the Department of Public Health – April 2, 2020

Atlanta – As Governor Brian Kemp and DPH Commissioner Kathleen E. Toomey, M.D.,
M.P.H., finalize the details of the Executive Order requiring Georgians to shelter in place, it is
important to emphasize why these measures are needed now to keep all Georgians healthy and
safe and to stop the spread of COVID-19.

For weeks it has been known that people who were positive for COVID-19 but did not have
symptoms likely were able to transmit the virus. However, on March 30, Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Robert Redfield, M.D., confirmed that new data indicates
that as many as 25% of individuals infected with COVID-19 remain asymptomatic. Additionally,
science also now informs us that individuals who are symptomatic, are infectious up to 48
hours before symptoms appear. This new information tells the health care community,
medical researchers, public health and governments why COVID-19 is spreading so rapidly.
“Until now, containing the spread of COVID-19 has been based on early detection and isolation
of people with symptoms of the virus,” said Toomey. “Social distancing and keeping people
apart from each other are now more than just recommendations; they are the best weapons we
have to stop the spread of COVID-19.”

In addition to social distancing, all Georgians are reminded to wash their hands frequently and
thoroughly with soap and water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer (60% alcohol) when
soap and water aren’t available. Avoid touching your face, nose, mouth, and eyes with
unwashed hands. Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue, and throw the used tissue in
the trash.

To read more about the presymptomatic transmission of COVID-19:
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/clinical-guidance-management-patients.html
https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6914e1.htm?s_cid=mm6914e1_w
For more information about COVID-19 https://dph.georgia.gov/novelcoronavirus or
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

For updates on the COVID-19 situation as it develops, follow @GaDPH, @GeorgiaEMA, and
@GovKemp on Twitter and @GaDPH, @GEMA.OHS, and @GovKemp on Facebook.

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